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©2018 KAYFABE KICKOUT

Interview With Lizzie Raze, Pro Wrestler & DigBoston's Bar Havoc Columnist

 

Welcome back wrestling fans for another great interview here on Kayfabe Kickout. For this interview I had the immense pleasure to interview Boston Native Lizzie Raze.

Lizzie is a newcomer in the world of professional wrestling, having started her career in 2013 but with her impressive stature, standing at 6'3 and her eagerness to learn, she will no doubt be a success. 

Lizzie spoke on who her inspiration to get in the pro wrestling business was, on how supportive her family was when she decided to become a pro wrestler, her love for tattoos and more

Richard: For some wrestling fans who may not be familiar with your career in professional wrestling, can you give us an update on what's going on in the busy schedule of Lizzie Raze?

Lizzie: Right now I am still really overjoyed with my win in a 2 woman, 27 man battle royal at the UFO Wrestling Boston Children’s Hospital Fundraiser. Those guys underestimated me since I’ve been out since last January after having ankle surgery to repair an in-ring injury. I also have also just started competing with my friend Nikki Valentine with New England Championship Wrestling. You can check us out online at WWW.NECW.TV and also Thursday nights just past midnight (12:30am) on Cozi TV. I also post my schedule on my facebook page, www.facebook.com/LizzieRaze.

Richard: You stand at 6'3, which is a rarity these days in terms of female professional wrestlers. Do you see you height as a hindrance or as an asset in your career?

Lizzie: My height literally makes me stand a head above the rest. I’m taller than a lot of guys I know and every single girl and that certainly gives me an in-ring advantage. It’s an asset for sure.

Richard: Who was the number one women's pro wrestler who inspired you to get into the business, if you had one that is?

Lizzie: You know, I got into wrestling a little later in life. I didn’t have that traditional wrestling childhood lifestyle that so many others have had. I got into wrestling as an adult, and as cliche as it might sound the guy who got me into it was John Cena. I was covering a pay-per-view event at the Garden in Boston and he was there meeting all the reporters and a few survivors of breast cancer. That night we were told hat he has raised a million dollars to go to breast cancer research by donating the money he made selling his WWE merchandise (amongst other things). I thought, “Wow, what other sport does this? This man has a gift, he can do what he loves and touch so many lives. How special.” I decided after my interview to stick around and see what the fuss was about and as soon as I walked into the arena I fell in love. The rest is history. Now that I’m here to stay in the wrestling universe I very much admire Lita. She’s one of the boys! That’s how I want to be.

Richard: You are currently training as a student at Bell Time Club - VCW Live, what do you hope to achieve when you finish your training?

Lizzie: A wrestler’s training is never done! I learn something new every day and there’s always room to perfect that which you think you already know. 

Richard: When you decided to train as a women's pro wrestler in 2013, were your family and friends supportive of your decision?

Lizzie: My family and friends thought I was crazy! They still do. But now that it’s been a year and they see the progress I’ve made and how committed to it I still am they are proud of me. My parents have watched me sustain a couple of serious injuries and I know they would prefer I had taken up something a little more traditional but they are supportive in anything and everything I do. It’s great.

Richard: Over the last 25 years or so Women's Professional Wrestling has changed dramatically in terms of how it's presented, in your opinion do you think it's better today, or has the change hurt the product overall?

Lizzie: Women’s wrestling most certainly has changed. There are still moments in women’s matches now that make me say, “WOW!” but with the coming of shows on TV like E’s “Total Divas” I can’t help but feel like the girls are here to be flashy rather than add to the product. That’s not necessarily a bad thing! I love being flashy, pretty, and sometimes silly with my femininity. I think the girls wrestling in the public eye do a great job of being sexy and athletic. That’s important in he world of female pro-wrestling.

Richard: If you had the chance to wrestle any female professional wrestler, past or present, who would that wrestler be and why?

Lizzie: I would love to wrestle Lita. She would destroy me. She’s one of the boys, she wrestles like a man and doesn’t take any crap. I could learn so much from her. 

Richard: Switching topics for a second, you are an avid tattoo aficionado, do you think tattoos reaching mainstream status in this day and age have killed its overall mystique?

Lizzie: No way! Tattoos are a bit more mainstream these days but they will never not be a head turner.

Richard: Where do you see yourself in five years, in terms of your career in 
professional wrestling?

Lizzie: In five years I would like to see myself doing what I’m doing now. It would be great to be on TV, a top dog, able to help people on a larger scale the way the guys and girls with the WWE or TNA are now. But right now I am doing that on a smaller scale and it still means the world to me. In five years I hope I am still as in love with wrestling as I am now. I wouldn't have it any other way.

- Fans can follow Lizzie Raze on Twitter @BarHavoc and on Facebook as well.

I would like to personally thank Lizzie Raze for taking the time to speak with me here on Kayfabe Kickout.

 

Follow us on Twitter @Kayfabe_Kickout, to get the latest news in the world of professional wrestling and like us on Facebook as well. To submit wrestling news email kayfabekickout2012@gmail.com

 

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